AMS experiment mission overview

AMS experiment mission overview

Mission name Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, AMS-02
Launch date October 2005 (Flight UF 4.1) New date TBD
Mission duration 3 years
Primary objective To search for heavy antimatter in cosmic rays, by measuring the charges on ~1,000,000,000 helium and other nuclei
General objectives To collect precision cosmic ray data at high energies, including 10^10 protons; to discover or rule out certain particles as explanations for dark matter; to study cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy; to search for exotic particles or spectral features among cosmic rays
Prototype flight AMS-01, a simplified version of the detector, flew on Space Shuttle Discovery for the STS-91 mission (the final shuttle-MIR docking) in July 1998. AMS-01 observed millions of helium nuclei, but no antihelium.
Weight 14,809 lbs (6731 kg)
Power 2000 watts
Data rate 10 GBit/sec internal data pipeline
2 MB/sec data ISS to ground
total of ~200 terabyes over mission
Computing power On orbit: 750 MHz main computers,
PowerPC, single-board, four redundant copies
OS: Linux
On ground: Analysis computation farm TBD
Space Station Inboard, upper Payload Attach Point on S3 Truss of the International Space Station
Launch Vehicle US Space Shuttle
Collaborating Institutions U. of Aarhus (DK); Academia Sinica (Taiwan); U. of Bucharest (RO); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Inst. of High Energy Physics IHEP (Beijing); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Electrical Engineering IEE (Beijing); Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas CIEMAT (Madrid, ES); Chung Shan Inst. of Science and Technology CSIST (Taiwan); EHWA Women's University (Seoul, KR) ETH Zurich (CH); Florida A&M U. (Tallahassee, FL); U. of Geneva (CH); Helsinki U. of Technology (FI); INFN Bologna & U. Bologna (IT); INFN Milano (IT); INFN Perugia, (IT); & U. Perugia (IT); INFN Pisa & U. Pisa (IT); INFN Roma & U. Roma (IT); INFN Siena & U Siena (IT); Inst. Superior Technico (Lisbon, PT); Inst. di Ricerca sulle Onde Elettromagnetiche IROE (Florence, IT); Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires de Grenoble ISN (FR); Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP (Moscow, RU), Jiao Tong U. (Shanghai); Johns Hopkins U. (Baltimore, US); U. of Karlsruhe (DE); Kurchatov Institute (Moscow, RU); Kyungpook National University CHEP (Taegu, KR); Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules LAPP (FR); Laboratório de Instrumentaço e Física Experimental de Partículas LIP (Lisbon, PT); U. Maryland (College Park, US); Max Planck Inst. (Garching, DE) ; Massachusetts Inst. of Technology MIT (Cambridge, US); U. Montpellier (FR); Moscow State University (RU), Nat'l Aerospace Laboratory NRL (Amsterdam, NL); U. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (MX); Nat'l Space Program Office (Taiwan); Nat'l Central University NCU (Taiwan); Nat'l Inst. for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics NIKHEF (Amsterdam, NL) I. Physikalisches Inst., RWTH Aachen (DE); III. Physikalisches Inst., RWTH Aachen (DE); Southeast U. (Nanjing); U. of Turku (FI); Yale U. (New Haven, US);
Number of Scientists over 200
Some major contractors Lockheed Martin, USA; Space Cryomagnetics LTD, UK; Arde, Inc., USA; CAEN Aerospace, IT; Carlo Gavazzi Space SpA, IT; ISATECH Engineering GmbH, DE; OHB GmbH, DE

Click here to return to the AMS tour